Seven facts about testicular cancer and fertility

Seven facts about testicular cancer and fertility

Testicular cancer may be common in men during the peak of their fertility, but if detected early, is highly curable and may not severely impact plans of having a biological family. But what if it isn’t treated fast enough?

Consultant Urologist Dr Hemanth Kumar Ramasamy at Tropicana Medical Centre shares seven facts on the disease and how sperm banking before starting treatment can act as an insurance plan, just in case the ability to produce sperm is minimised during treatment.

  1. The most common type of cancer in males between the ages of 20 to 40 is testicular cancer.
  1. Fertility preservation options become especially important during this age and should be considered by all men as a precautionary measure.
  1. But fret not! With advancements in modern medicine the chances are, you won’t die from testicular cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, only 1 in 5,000 men diagnosed succumb to it.
  1. In fact, the effectiveness of testicular cancer treatments are so encouraging that five-year survival rates for men who have it are above 95 per cent.
  1. Treating it through radiation and chemotherapy may affect your ability to produce healthy sperm, and a low healthy sperm count may lead to fertility problems post treatment.
  2. Save yourself from emotional grief and spending excessively later by banking your sperm. Frozen sperm can last decades, so when the right time comes, your partner can undergo artificial insemination to conceive your baby even after your testicular cancer treatment. Speak to your doctor to find out more about this. It may just do you a world of good!
  1. There is hope! Cancer researchers and fertility experts are researching new ways of giving testicular cancer survivors the chance of having babies just like everyone else.

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