Is 100% juice healthy for you? No.

Is 100% juice healthy for you? No.
Dr. Heather Ferris, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology and metabolism at University of Virginia with her colleagues shares a story with the Washington Post – a patient, Mrs. G had come to their offices for her first visit distraught and seeking for advice. Her primary-care doctor had just diagnosed her with diabetes. She was shocked by the diagnosis. She had always been overweight and had relatives with diabetes, but she believed she lived a healthy lifestyle.

One of the habits that she identified as healthy was drinking freshly squeezed juice, which she saw as a virtuous food, every day. She was asked to stop drinking juice entirely. She left the office somewhat unconvinced, but after three months of cutting out the juice and making some changes to her diet, her diabetes was under control without the need for insulin.

The truth is that fruit juice, even if it is freshly pressed, 100 percent juice, is little more than sugar water. We are inundated with the message that juice is healthy.

At first glance, it is reasonable to think that juice has health benefits. Whole fruit is healthy, and juice comes from fruit, so it must be healthy, too. But when you make juice, you leave some of the most wholesome parts of the fruit behind.

The skin on an apple, the seeds in raspberries and the membranes that hold orange segments together — they are all good for you. That is where most of the fibre, as well as many of the antioxidants, phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals are hiding.

Fibre is good for your gut; it fills you up and slows the absorption of the sugars you eat, resulting in smaller spikes in insulin. When your body can no longer keep up with your need for insulin, Type 2 diabetes can develop.

Comments are closed.